... every Christian must be a "disciple." Or, as Blessed John Henry Newman says in many places, every Christian serious about his faith must commit to living "under a rule."



Aurora Griffin, the author of "How I Stayed Catholic at Harvard" (Ignatius Press, 2016), studied classics at Harvard, won a Rhodes Scholarship to Oxford, where she studied theology, and has accepted a job offer with the prestigious consulting firm, McKinsey. That is quite a series of credentials. And now she has written her first book.

By its title you might suppose that the book is another offering in the genre of "how to stay Catholic in a hostile secular environment." Yet it is not that, but rather an enthusiastic recommendation for the way that she and her Catholic friends lived the faith while they were undergraduates. Her core idea, although she does not express quite it this way, is that every Christian must be a "disciple." Or, as Blessed John Henry Newman says in many places, every Christian serious about his faith must commit to living "under a rule."

The book embraces the lesson of Psalm 1, "Blessed is the man who does not walk in the counsel of the wicked, ... Rather, the law of the LORD is his joy; and on his law he meditates day and night. He is like a tree planted near streams of water, that yields its fruit in season; Its leaves never wither; whatever he does prospers." Griffin wants to tell a young person starting out in adult life is that if you come to know, love and serve the Lord, not vaguely, but through definite practices, you will prosper.